Current Exhibitions

- Current - Upcoming - Recently off the Wall

Nelson Augustus Moore, A Country Romance, 1865. Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in., Collection of Todd and Marenda Stitzer

Nelson Augustus Moore
Connecticut Water, Hills, and Sky
Sept. 20, 2014–Jan. 11, 2015
Opening Reception
2-5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014

Nelson Augustus Moore’s exquisitely beautiful 19th-century paintings of the Connecticut landscape reveal the mastery of this Kensington artist.

During the 19th century, photography was positioned to compete with the efficacy of naturalistic painting. Nelson Augustus Moore (1824–1902) embraced both mediums to capture his beloved hometown of Kensington, Connecticut, where the Moore family lived and flourished for many generations. Beginning September 20, the NBMAA will feature oil paintings and photographs in the exhibition Nelson Augustus Moore: Connecticut Water, Hills, and Sky.

The paintings on display have been generously loaned by Todd and Marenda Stitzer. As they explain, "Our home in Kensington—Hillside Cottage—sits near the top of Mooreland Hill on land once owned by the Moores. Little did we know when we purchased our home that Nelson Augustus Moore was a member of this illustrious family or that he painted the very views we see from our windows. Once we made the connection, we immediately decided to bring the best of Moore's work home to Kensington where they were created. The paintings in the exhibition are the result.”

Born in Kensington in 1824, Moore studied art in New York City and later returned to open the first commercial daguerreotype business in the state with his brother. Throughout his life, Moore continued to paint idyllic landscapes of New York and New England. The paintings will be presented alongside four of Moore’s photographs of Kensington from the Museum’s permanent collection as well as contemporary images of the vistas Moore depicted.


An image from John O'Donnell's Psychedelic Pantry.

 

New Media: John O'Donnell
Sept. 6, 2014–Feb. 8, 2015
Opening Reception
2-3:30 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014
Artist Remarks at 2:30 p.m.
ARTIST PERFORMANCE
8-11 p.m., Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
@ Museum After Dark

Psychedelic Pantry, a new media installation created by John O’Donnell, points to moments of everyday life while highlighting the bazaar and mysterious moments we often overlook while shuffling to the toaster or coffee maker in the morning.

Appearing as a simple representation of a kitchen area or pantry, further inspection reveals there is more happening than food storage. Psychedelic Pantry is a New Media installation that reveals moments of constructed metaphysical awareness to reveal hallucinatory or surreal sensation, playing on ideas of peripheral vision and imagined movement. The aesthetic is informed by the combination of rather mundane objects typically found in a kitchen and psychedelic imagery. This installation intends to move past the typical category of drug induced awareness and speak about the potential of common items and commercial packaging to inform a heightened experience. Inspired by the brightly colored packaging of cereal boxes and other common snacks, this installation calls our attention to the hypnotic, and often times annoying, design of food items packaging. This is also a reference to the growing number of artificial additives that are found in a large portion of the food for sale in a grocery store and ultimately brought home for temporary storage before consumption.

O’Donnell, who lives and works in Connecticut, is a multidisciplinary artist and has created performance pieces for the Museum of New Art in Detroit, Proof Gallery in Boston, Flux Space in Philadelphia, and SOHO20 Gallery in New York City.



Artist Bob Gregson demonstrates how Spin Cycle works. Bob Gregson, Spin Cycle, 2014, Acrylic on Trupan, 55 x 55 in., Courtesy of the artist

NEW/NOW: Bob Gregson
July 26–Oct. 26, 2014
Opening Reception
2-3:30 p.m., Sunday, July 27, 2014
Artist Remarks at 2:30 p.m.

In our world of Twitter, iPhones, Facebook, and other forms of social media, many people live removed from the physical world. Bob Gregson’s work counteracts this lack of intimate involvement and creates situations that constantly shift the rules and allow for new encounters.

There is a reason why Bob Gregson’s work is fun. His exhibition Space to Maneuver harnesses humor to gently draw people into the work and provide
opportunities for participation: rolling on your back, turning panels or rearranging objects, alone or with others who may be total strangers.

Space to Maneuver is at once a playful and thought-provoking exhibition that questions the relationship between the viewer and the art object. As Gregson explains, “The basic message may be that art is serious but not sacred…I also enjoy the idea that the work is never actually completed but continually reinterpreted and refreshed through those who encounter it.” His work adds a new twist to a long line of art movements that have challenged the definition of art, including Dada, Fluxus, Happenings, Conceptual art as well as Minimalism.

Bob Gregson received a BFA from Hartford Art School and an MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago.
He has been the artistic director for hundreds of public events, which he calls “situations”—mixing community
participation with large scale inflatable sculptures, scaffolding, mazes, and theatrical lighting. He has taught art classes at numerous museums and universities. He has authored and illustrated many books about art and participation and lectures widely on the subject. He is a Silvermine Guild Artist and is the creative director of the Connecticut Office of Tourism.

Available Video:
Bob Gregson "New Britain Exhibition"

The NEW/NOW Series is made possible by the generous support of Marzena and Greg Silpe.


Beth Lipman, Aspects of (American) Life
(illustration 2)

Special Opening Reception
Beth Lipman, Aspects of (American) Life
Wednesday, May 14, 2:30 p.m.

Canceled due to severe storm weather/flight delay. The installation is still scheduled to be completed by May 16.

Join us to celebrate the unveiling of Beth Lipman's Aspects of (American) Life. The latest addition to the Museum's Appropriation & Inspiration series, this installation relates directly to Thomas Hart Benton's epic murals The Art of Life in America. Borrowing objects depicted in the murals, Lipman creates a monumental three-dimensional still-life sculpture from clear glass as a meditation on the good fortunes of wealth and prosperity as well as the misfortunes that ensue from their abuse.

Don't miss the opportunity to meet this world-renowned glass artist and learn about one of her largest projects to date.



Soo Sunny Park Concept

Soo Sunny Park
Opening Reception
2-3:30 p.m., Sunday, Mar. 9, 2014

The Museum is delighted to announce plans to unveil the third site-specific installation for February 2014 to animate the LeWitt Family Staircase where undulating, effervescent abstract forms seemingly float above the staircase landing. The artist, Soo Sunny Park, is known for creating otherworldly, immersive installations that transform their environments into seas of dancing light, reflection and shadow. Her proposal for the LeWitt Family Staircase is no exception.

As the artist explains, “The space will be filled with sinuous, large, sprawling structures on two opposing walls (units composed of weaving of metal grid and clear, iridescent, “edge glowing” Plexi glass), which transmit, reflect, and refract light while the painted dark walls of the gallery are enclosed with images that echo the shadows and reflections of the gleaming sculpture. The images are articulated with charcoal and graphite.” Changing light conditions will reveal different facets of the sculpture, so that during different times of day it will be transformed from translucent and clear to colorful and prismatic. The installation will harness daylight and artificial light as mediums with which to create, blurring the line between the physical drawing and the light drawing.

Born in Seoul, South Korea, Soo Sunny Park received her BFA in painting and sculpture from Columbus College of Art & Design in Columbus, Ohio and a MFA in sculpture from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Park is a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant; Grand Prize winner of the 19th Annual Michigan Fine Arts Competition; The Helen Foster Barnett Prize, National Academy Museum, New York; Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture residency, Skowhegan, Maine; Cité Internationale des Arts studio residency, Paris, France, and the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Arts & Literary Arts Residency, Bellagio, Italy.

Her most recent installations are Capturing Resonance (2011–12), created with composer Spencer Topel for the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and Unwoven Light (2013) for Rice Gallery in Houston, Texas. Park lives and works in Hanover, New Hampshire, where she is Associate Professor of Studio Art at Dartmouth College.