Upcoming exhibitions

- Current - Upcoming - Recently off the Wall

Nelson Augustus Moore, A Country Romance, 1865. Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in., Collection of Todd and Marenda Stitzer

Nelson Augustus Moore
Connecticut Water, Hills, and Sky
Sept. 20, 2014–Jan. 11, 2015
Opening Reception
2-5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014

Nelson Augustus Moore’s exquisitely beautiful 19th-century paintings of the Connecticut landscape reveal the mastery of this Kensington artist.

During the 19th century, photography was positioned to compete with the efficacy of naturalistic painting. Nelson Augustus Moore (1824–1902) embraced both mediums to capture his beloved hometown of Kensington, Connecticut, where the Moore family lived and flourished for many generations. Beginning September 20, the NBMAA will feature oil paintings and photographs in the exhibition Nelson Augustus Moore: Connecticut Water, Hills, and Sky.

The paintings on display have been generously loaned by Todd and Marenda Stitzer. As they explain, "Our home in Kensington—Hillside Cottage—sits near the top of Mooreland Hill on land once owned by the Moores. Little did we know when we purchased our home that Nelson Augustus Moore was a member of this illustrious family or that he painted the very views we see from our windows. Once we made the connection, we immediately decided to bring the best of Moore's work home to Kensington where they were created. The paintings in the exhibition are the result.”

Born in Kensington in 1824, Moore studied art in New York City and later returned to open the first commercial daguerreotype business in the state with his brother. Throughout his life, Moore continued to paint idyllic landscapes of New York and New England. The paintings will be presented alongside four of Moore’s photographs of Kensington from the Museum’s permanent collection as well as contemporary images of the vistas Moore depicted.



Kate Themel, New Year's Eve, 2012, Cotton, 44 x 41 in., Courtesy of the artist

Let Me Quilt One More Day
Saturday, Oct. 4–Sunday, Jan. 4, 2015
Opening Reception
2-5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014
4 p.m. Remarks by Douglas Hyland

American quilting has dramatically been transformed over the past 250 years. Let Me Quilt One More Day showcases a history of the artistic practices, reinterpretations, and innovations of this age-old craft.

Let Me Quilt One More Day explores the long-standing practice and art of quilt making in the United States. This exhibition, curated by Dr. Douglas Hyland, brings together an extraordinary selection of over 40 historical and contemporary quilts ranging from traditional to modern designs and demonstrating both the practical application and artistic range found in this medium. The themes of Industry, Emotion, and Art loosely group quilts that vary greatly in material and artistic style.

The quilts speak to the lives, history, and aspirations of the artisans who created them while examples of contemporary works display how this fascinating medium has evolved and yet, in many ways, the traditions have stayed the same.

Noted quilt authority Lynne Z. Bassett, advised on the selection of objects for this exhibition, and her catalogue essay adds immensely to our understanding of this craft and art form.

The exhibition contains works from the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, Mattatuck Museum, New Haven Museum and Historical Society, Fenimore Art Museum, Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum, and Connecticut Historical Society. In addition we are fortunate to have works by contemporary quilters: Barbara Barrick McKie, Richard Killeaney, Todd Knopke, Norma Schlager, Denyse Schmidt, Marlene Shea, Kate Themel, Anna Tufankjian, and Victoria Findlay Wolfe along with works from the collections of others.



Titus Kaphar, The Vesper Project, detail, 2012, Mixed media installation, Courtesy of Burger Collection, Hong Kong & Friedman Benda, New York

NEW/NOW: Titus Kaphar
The Vesper Project

Saturday, Oct. 4–Sunday, Jan. 4, 2015
Opening Reception
2-3:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014
2:30 p.m. Artist Remarks

‘The Vesper Project’ is a massive sculptural statement— an encompassing installation, in which Titus Kaphar’s own work is seamlessly woven into the walls of a 19th-century American house. It is the culmination of an intense five-year engagement with the lost storylines of the Vesper family, a 19th-century family of mixed descent that passed as white. The project was “birthed in a state of extended disbelief,” according to Kaphar. As the artist’s muses, the members of the Vesper family and their histories are intertwined with Kaphar’s autobiographical details, and layered with wide-based cultural triggers of identity and truth.

In ‘The Vesper Project,’ period architecture, gilt frames, a vintage typewriter, a neglected wardrobe, and old photographs act as seemingly recognizable elements, but by employing every tool of his trade, Kaphar insinuates doubt and transports the viewer into a disrupted mental state. As the house fractures, like the lives of the Vesper family, so does the viewer’s experience. In so doing, Kaphar compresses time and history, postulating new, powerful realities.

The Museum is grateful to Max and Monique Burger for funding the Museum’s presentation of ‘The Vesper Project.’



Brett Weston, Horseshoe Crab, detail, 1945, Gelatin silver print, 10 x 14 in., Bank of America Collection

Group ƒ.64: Revolutionary Vision
Tuesday, Oct. 7–Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015
Opening Reception
2-5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 12, 2014
3:30 p.m. Remarks

Group ƒ.64: Revolutionary Vision showcases Photography by Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Willard Van Dyke, Brett Weston and Edward Weston. Works from the Bank of America Collection

Founded in 1932, Group ƒ.64 was an informal association of Bay Area photographers devoted to promoting a new direction in photography. “ƒ.64” refers to the large-format camera aperture, which produces the maximum depth of field yielding sharply focused and graphic compositions. Their group established a challenge to Pictorialism, a movement favoring painterly, hand-manipulated, and soft-focus prints. On November 15, 1932, the work of the original eleven members of Group ƒ.64 was shown in a major exhibition at the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco. Group ƒ.64: Revolutionary Vision features five of the most important members of this group.

True to modernist beliefs, the members of Group ƒ.64 argued that photography could only advance as an art form if its practitioners exploited the characteristics inherent to the camera’s mechanical nature. “Pure photography is defined as possessing no qualities of technic [sic], composition or idea, derivative of any other art form,” reads their manifesto. Photography was considered only valid when it was “straight,” or unaltered. The group preferred contact prints, made on a sheet in direct contact with the negative. This technique gave the photographs rich clarity, subtle definition and maximum tonal range.

Group ƒ.64 disbanded in 1935, but many of its members remained active and are now considered among the most influential photographers of the 20th century. This exhibition features nearly fifty works faithful to their revolutionary philosophy.



Diana Zlatanovski of Arlington, MA stands by her first prize winning work Bundle Typology, Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology.

Nor’Easter: The 45th Annual Juried Members Exhibition
Saturday, Jan. 10–Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015

The exhibition is a prime opportunity for the Museum to highlight the exceptional work of emerging artists in all media and expose contemporary visual arts to a wide audience.

Once again digital entries (up to three per artist, $10 per entry) will be accepted through CaFÉ, the online application and jury management system, at www.callforentry.org. Entry is open to current NBMAA members at least 18 years old. The deadline for submissions is Nov. 14.

This year’s exhibition will be juried by Sharon Butler, artist and author of the influential art blog Two Coats of Paint.

First prize: $1,000
Second prize: $500
Third prize: $250
Juror’s Award:
Upgraded NBMAA Membership to Friend’s Circle Level (includes North American Reciprocal Museum Membership) and NBMAA Blog interview
Visitors’ Choice: NBMAA Blog interview and write-up on the website

For more information contact Jenna Lucas, Development Associate at (860) 229-0257, ext. 231 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it