Panel Discussion | Reflections on Race and the Power of Art Zoom Webinar

(left to right) Ashley James, Elizabeth Colomba, Frank Mitchell, and Thomas Thurston
(left to right) Ashley James, Elizabeth Colomba, Frank Mitchell, and Thomas Thurston

ABOUT THE EVENT

Panel Discussion | Reflections on Race and the Power of Art Zoom Webinar

Panel discussion featuring Thomas Thurston, Education Director, The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance & Abolition, Yale University; Ashley Jones, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum; Elizabeth Colomba, artist; and Frank Mitchell, Executive Director, Amistad Center for Art & Culture.

This panel will provide an opportunity to understand and appreciate both human history and current affairs as Walker’s work reveals disparities in historical representations of African Americans and creates opportunity for a dialogue about it today. Not only is it historically important, but timely and relevant to facilitate thoughtful discussions and encourage an ongoing dialogue.

Frank Mitchell,  moderator is experienced in helping people hold difficult conversations about race, culture and equity by using art as a tool to facilitate these conversations. Using Walker’s portfolio as catalyst, Mitchell will guide a discussion among this diverse group of panelists centered on the themes within Walker’s work and their ongoing prevalence in America today by using their experiences and expertise.

Panelists with help uncover diverse perspectives and interpretations of Walker's work as it relates to American history, slavery and race. Thomas Thurston’s expertise is slavery, resistance and abolition; Ashley James’ research on the relationships between politics, art, and blackness; and Elizabeth Colomba's unique perspective as a working artist who, like Walker, uses her work to explore the nature of race representation. Their unique perspectives will allow them to together contextualize Walker’s work within the field of contemporary American art and culture; Walker’s modification of the historical prints and their relevance in the America today; and have a dialogue about race, identity, and experience. We hope to broaden our audience’s perspectives on the history of race and what is means to be a black person in the United States.

The program will conclude with a Q&A session providing opportunities for audience members to expand their knowledge and understanding.

Registration link forthcoming.

Sponsors:

Programming for Kara Walker: Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated) is made possible by Connecticut Humanities

Admission

Free

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